How to Develop an Honest Philosophy?

We live in a world of broken promises. We live in a time when people treat their words lightly.

We tell a friend we will call her next week for lunch knowing full well we do not have the time to do so. We promise a co-worker we will bring in that new book we love so much knowing full well the we never lend out our books. And we promise ourselves this will be the year we will get back into shape, simplify our lives and have more fun without any real intention of making the deep life changes necessary to achieve these goals.

Saying things we don’t really mean becomes a habit when we practice it long enough. The real problem is that when you don’t keep your word, you lose credibility. When you lose credibility, you break the bonds of trust. And breaking the bonds of trust ultimately leads to a string of broken relationships.

To develop an honest philosophy, begin to monitor how many small untruths you tell over the course of a week. Go on what I call a “truth fast” for the next seven days and vow to be completely honest in all your dealings with others – and with yourself.

Every time you fail to do the right thing, you fuel the habit of doing the wrong thing. Every time you do not tell the truth, you feed the habit of being untruthful.

When you promise someone you will do something, do it. Be a person of your word rather than being “all talk and no action.” As mother Teresa said, “there should be less talk; a preaching point is not a meeting point. What do you do then? Take a broom and clean someone’s house. That says enough.”

Who will cry when you die? (Robin Sharma)

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Hello wonderful bloggers!

I hope you’re having an awesome day, if not, make it awesome!

I am really glad to share this with you. It is a book excerpt from the book (who will cry when you die?) which teaches beautiful life lessons in a simple manner, by Robin Sharma.

I hope you liked it reading, too. But only reading these post is the last thing you should do because we need to IMPLEMENT these life lessons in our life. 

Let me know in the comment’s section if you liked this post, and share your views upon it…

Make an awesome day!

See you soon…

😊😊😊

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68 thoughts on “How to Develop an Honest Philosophy?

  1. I do like the post, very much actually. It’s a real truth we experience. It’s easier to just talk, without backing it up with action, even though we know very well it is a wrong thing to do.
    Thanks for sharing this

    Liked by 2 people

  2. You’re right. We’re habituated of faking promises and some people don’t even mind after breaking them while some gets hurt in the process.
    This a must to implement in our lives.
    Lovely thought!
    It’s better to be blunt and say no rather than fake a promise right?

    Liked by 1 person

      1. I am a strong believer of this thing because of which people sometimes takes me as rude πŸ˜€
        I prefer bitter truth than sugar-coated lies.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Being honest means you don’t have to remember any lies. I like reading posts that resonate with my own ever-developing philosophy.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. You had a bang on today’s reality. That’s what most people doing these days, not keeping their promises, all shallow words and honesty is lost. Great postπŸ‘
    And yes I read the book , still there in my collection…nyc book!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I think you hit it right on the head. Rigorous honesty in everything we do is the key to unlocking a philosophy beneficial to us and the world around us. The reason most people are dishonest is because they worry about the reactions of others when they tell the truth, which is a manifest of the ego.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You are absolutely correct. We tend to make false promises just to please the other one, not knowing the fact that ultimately it will affect both of us!
      😊
      Thank you so much for reading and sharing your views…

      Like

  6. Yeah I agree , so many things we say without meaning and respect for the word ‘honest’! I’ve often adopted the same stance , be completely honest and truthful to others … only problem is that it might offend them ! But then again promising something to someone knowing full well you won’t keep that promise , isn’t that offensive in itself ? Food for thought.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We all try not to offend the other person because we think that being too staraight-forward might be bad, but an honest compliment is better than thousand fake compliments. I think so because ebing truthful will not only get you that person’s trust but it will leave an impression of you being truthful and honest. Yeah, soemtimes it’s offending but if the other person is smart and wise enough, he/she won’t get offended, instead they will listen to you!
      πŸ™‚
      Thanks for the read…

      Like

  7. Hello Fab,

    great post. It is so true.We live in a time when human word is not worth much.But there are people who respect their word,and indeed because of that the human words has an even greater value .
    Thanks

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I loved this post. I completely agree…telling just one simple lie can lead to a chain of many little lies that lead to bigger and bigger lies…I love that you brought this topic up because I feel that we all need to accept the fact that we need to deprive ourselves of this or these habits.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s the truth of lying, to hide one lie you have to cover it with thousands more of it.
      I am glad you liked this concept!!
      Thank you for reading all these post of mine, I’m overwhelmed, actually!!!
      I can’t thank you enough times… it means a lot to me!n

      Liked by 1 person

      1. This place. Your blog. I was stuck there. If it was not for my mother’s shout I wonder how I wouldve got out of there? I glanced over it and it was amazing. A lot of good stuff there that I hope to cover soon. Gppd job.

        Liked by 1 person

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